Polio Source—Steve LeBano

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/feb/08/polio-workers-nigeria-shot-dead

This article discusses recent events surrounding the polio controversy in Nigeria. The gunmen, who are believed to be members of an Islamic terrorist group known as the Boko Haram, murdered at least 9 women who were vaccinating children against polio. Many believe this attack and others to be a reaction to distrust of the American government. The article states that “there were fears that Boko Haram is copying tactics used by militants in those countries who accuse health workers of spying for the US.” Other groups in Nigeria speculate that the vaccines may be tainted in some way. Distrust in the American government is a recurring trend in Nigeria that has been brought back to the forefront in response to this recent attack on polio vaccinations.

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This entry was posted in A05: White Paper Polio, Steve LeBano, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Polio Source—Steve LeBano

  1. davidbdale says:

    Hey, Steve!
    Thank you for this useful source. You didn’t say how you found it, so please reply to let me know whether or not you used an academic search engine as I recommended.

    Shortly, if not already, you’ll know how strongly I object to language without claims, such as: This article discusses recent events surrounding the polio controversy in Nigeria. Suppose you’re a high school student living at home without a car of your own and your mother meets you at the door one night to say: “Your father would like to discuss recent events surrounding the use of the car by family members.” Your reasonable question for Mom will of course be: What the hell are you talking about?!

    Once you revise your language to make clearer claims, Steve, you’ll have an additional challenge. How would you use this new source to prove an argument? The argument can be anything you’d like to prove. The evidence from the source can be anywhere. This material contains countless claims. Which one or many of them would you use to support your own argument?

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