Critical Reading- Kailee Whiting

Anthony Ozomic

It may be that without the donation of an organ, people will die, but with the nature of organ donation it’s a gift not a duty. 00:16

-Of course people will die if they don’t receive organs, that’s why they’re on the waiting list.

Well, not if they’re waiting for eyes.

-So if organ donation is a gift, should I be seeing a heart under my Christmas tree next year or a set of lungs next to my birthday cake?

Snarky is fun, Kailee, but what is the nature of your objection to this claim? Organ donation may well be a gift (especially if the donor is alive and gives, say one kidney). And yes, I will leave it under the tree for you.

-What exactly is Anthony’s experience with organ donation?

Is his experience relevant?

-Is he qualified to even make such claims?

I think you and I are qualified to say whether organs are a gift.

I’m Anthony Ozomich, I’m a Catholic.  00:27

-What about being Catholic effects organ donation?

Nothing necessarily.

We have seen a move towards euthanasia here by removing food and fluids and reasonable medical treatment so it is not unreasonable to be worried that the ends of people’s lives are being hastened and one of the motivations for that will be organ removal.  00:56

-Who is “we”?

You might well ask, but as someone who constantly encourages writers to use “we,” I interpret it to mean “we who live here at this time and in this place,” unless otherwise specified.

-Is organ donation the main motivation of Euthanasia?

He pretty clearly says it’s not, by worrying that it might be “one of the motivations.”

– Anthony seems to claim that if he signs up for the organ register, that instead of proper medical care in a situation, doctors will administer Euthanasia.

Yes, he does. Is his fear unreasonable? It’s not uncommon.

I believe that it is too risky to be an organ donor in the current climate. 1:10

-“Climate”?  The weather?

An appopriate use of the word, I think: “Profits are hard to come by in this regulatory climate.”

-Why is it risky?

Because of the perceived rush to harvest his organs.

Also bodies are the temple of the holy spirit and it is simply not for the state or the medical profession or anyone else to dispose bodies or their organs as if the body was just a used car used for spare parts. 1:27

By making the claim that organs from a dead body are just spare parts from a used car really twists organ donation in a highly negative way.  When I personally think of an used car being parted to be used in other cars, I think of a fat middle-aged guy covered in grease hammering away trying to pry parts off the car.  And while I have never been present to see an organ donation surgery happen, I know for a fact it’s a much more delicate cleaner process.

Green note: Lose the “by” and never trust another introductory “by phrase” again.

Blue note: Since I have been present . . . I know for a fact.
While I have never been present . . . I feel quite certain.

I completely agree the speaker deliberately makes a negative analogy. It amounts to a categorical claim and/or an evaluation claim. As category, it’s useless, since nobody ever refuses to have his car torn apart for parts. As evaluation, it only succeeds with viewers who believe doctors are morbid and disrespectful or that bodies are sacred after death.

-Also by relation organ donation to car parts, I believe that Anthony really kills part of his argument.  The whole time he is trying to tell us that human lives are almost sacred and that his body is a “temple”.  But when you relate our organs to car parts, he severs that emotional link.

Blue note: Periods and commas ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS go inside the quotation marks.

He doesn’t say organs are similar to car parts; he says salvaging organs is like scrapping car parts. He means, as you know, to disparage doctors by comparing them to auto part pullers. His objection, quite clearly, is that a human cadaver is nothing like a used car.

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This entry was posted in A06: Critical Reading, Kailee Whiting. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Critical Reading- Kailee Whiting

  1. davidbdale says:

    See above for color-coded feedback, Kailee. We missed you on Tuesday.

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