Research Proposal—Mike Middleton

http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2012/04/paper-carbon-dioxide-sequester

Proposals with good intentions but have unexpected negative results are counterintuitive. One is utilizing paper instead plastic. Some people choose plastic because they think producing paper is more detrimental to the environment. This is actually not true because trees constantly remove carbon dioxide from the air and paper is recyclable.

Unexpectedly, there are numerous ways in which paper-making is environmentally friendly. For example, all trees remove CO2 from the environment and retain it. Lumber can hold carbon for years, so cutting trees and planting new ones is actually beneficial. “So long as the tree and products made from the tree haven’t decomposed or been burned (at which point the carbon joins with two oxygen, becoming carbon dioxide again) the carbon stays trapped inside it, serving as a carbon sink.”

Producing paper is much more beneficial than most people often think. By producing more paper, carbon in the atmosphere will reduce and the amount of oxygen will increase.

 

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2 Responses to Research Proposal—Mike Middleton

  1. davidbdale says:

    Thanks, Mike. This is a great topic. Whatever the facts turn out to be, they will upset somebody’s firmly held belief, which is the true definition of a counterintuitive proof: it produces unexpected results.

    On the topic of your language use, Mike, I beg you to stop trying to sound academic and just say things directly. Your sentences are almost impossible to follow because they get so lost in words. I have numbered your sentences and revised them for you below. You don’t seem to want to conference with me, so you leave me little choice but to consult you this way.

    1. Human actions that rise from good intentions but which have unexpectedly negative results are counterintuitive. 2. One such choice is to use plastic instead of paper. 3. People choose plastic because they think the killing of trees to produce paper is more detrimental than making plastic; but paper is a pretty good carbon sink, and we can always make more of it.

    4. In fact, paper-making is unexpectedly environmentally friendly in several ways. 5. For example, trees remove harmful CO2 from the atmosphere and retain it. 6. Lumber holds carbon for decades, and paper for years, so producing them and planting new trees is quite beneficial. 7. Of course, letting the trees stand is even better. 8. “So long as the tree and products made from the tree haven’t decomposed or been burned (at which point the carbon joins with two oxygen, becoming carbon dioxide again) the carbon stays trapped inside it, serving as a carbon sink.”

    9. Not to mention, trees also emit oxygen, essential to humans, as a byproduct, . 10. So, to recap: producing paper instead of plastic reduces carbon in the atmosphere and increases oxygen. 11. The next time the checkout clerk asks: paper or plastic?, choose paper.

    The thought process behind the claims in this simplified—and highly more readable—version is just as complex as your draft, Mike. But its clarity make it so much easier to follow the argument and be persuaded by it. I’m not exactly sure the claims I’ve made are the claims you made because I struggle to grasp yours completely. That shouldn’t be. Any reader should be able to say what you intended and paraphrase it accurately if asked to.

    Does this help?

  2. mmiddleton1 says:

    Thank you very much for feedback! I realize that I often over complicate sentences, and often I think they make sense. Ill try making a much simpler proposal because originally I thought it had to be in-depth..Also, its not that I don’t want to conference, in fact I do, but I can’t seem to write correctly so maybe I really should.

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